Antioxidants Benefits & Effects of Polyphenols, Phenolic Acid

Polyphenols (Phenolic Acid) | Antioxidant Benefits & Effects on our body

Flavones Flavonols Flavanones Isoflavones Anthocyanidins Chalcones, Catechins,Stilbenes

Research in progress

 

About Polyphenol, Phenolic acids:

A phenolic acid is a sort of phytochemical known as a polyphenol. Phenolic acids are found in an assortment of plant-based nourishments such as the seeds and skins of products of the soil leaves of vegetables contain the most noteworthy concentration. Phenolic acids are promptly consumed through the dividers of your intestinal tract, and they might be valuable to your wellbeing since they fill in as cancer prevention agents that counteract cell harm because of free-radical oxidation responses. The Polyphenol phenolic acid supplements may likewise work as anti inflammatory in the human body. It strongly supports a role for polyphenols in the prevention of degenerative diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases and cancers. The antioxidant properties of polyphenols have been widely studied, but it has become clear that the mechanisms of action of polyphenols go beyond the modulation of oxidative stress. Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in the diet. Their total dietary intake could be as high as 1 g/d, which is much higher than that of all other classes of phytochemicals and known dietary antioxidants.

 

 

 

 

 

Ranking list of top foods list with Polyphenols (Phenolic Acid)

Polyphenols (Phenolic Acid) | Antioxidant Benefits & Effects on our body

Top foods list with Polyphenols (Phenolic Acid) | Antioxidant Benefits & Effects

Different Types of Polyphenols

Polyphenols are four main categories, with additional sub-groupings. based on the number of phenol rings they contain, and on the basis of structural elements in their construction.

As a general rule, foods contain complex mixtures of polyphenols, with higher levels found in the outer layers of the plants than the inner parts.

 

1- Flavonoids,  have Strong both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, found in fruits, vegetables, legumes, red wine, and green tea
      Flavones
      Flavonols
      Flavanones
      Isoflavones
      Anthocyanidins
      Chalcones
      Catechins
2- Stilbenes, found in red wine and peanuts (resveratrol is the most well known)
3- Lignans, found in seeds like flax, legumes, cereals, grains, fruits, algae, and certain vegetables
4- Phenolic acids
Hydroxybenzoic acids, found in tea
Hydroxycinnamic acids found in cinnamon of course but also in coffee, blueberries, kiwis, plums, apples, and cherries

 

Polyphenols (Phenolic Acid) | Antioxidant Benefits & Effects on our body

 

Polyphenols are usually associated with/ improving:

  • Fighting cancer cells and inhibiting angiogenesis (the growth of blood vessels that feed a tumor)
  • Protecting your skin against ultraviolet radiation
  • Fighting free radicals
  • reducing the appearance of aging
  • Promoting brain health
  • protecting against dementia
  • Reducing inflammation
  • Supporting normal blood sugar levels
  • Protecting your cardiovascular system
  • Promoting normal blood pressure

 

Polyphenols work effective for :

 

 

 

Antioxidants effects & Benefits of Phenolic acids:

• Anti-Diabetic Effects of  Polyphenols

Numerous studies report the antidiabetic effects of polyphenols. Tea catechins have been investigated for their anti-diabetic potential.63,64 Polyphenols may affect glycemia through different mechanisms, including the inhibition of glucose absorption in the gut or of its uptake by peripheral tissues.Onion polyphenols, especially quercetin is known to possess strong anti diabetic activity. A recent study shows that quercetin has ability to protect the alterations in diabetic patients during oxidative stress. Quercetin significantly protected the lipid peroxidation and inhibition antioxidant system in diabetics. (source)

Cranberry Strong Antioxidant Effects

 

• Used as Anti bacterial:

Bacteria are collection of single cell microorganisms. Most microorganisms are innocuous in people because of the defensive impacts of the immune framework. Notwithstanding, a few microscopic organisms are perilous and can bring about irresistible maladies. Luckily, phenol acids are effective antibacterials and can help guard you from perilous microorganisms. Temporary reviews recommend that phenolic acid may likewise have antibacterial properties however additional confirmation is required before this can be affirmed. (source)

 Sage, just a mint or strong antioxidants and Anti-Inflammatory

• Anti-Aging Effect

Aging is the accumulation process of diverse detrimental changes in the cells and tissues with advancing age, resulting in an increase in the risks of disease and death. Among many theories purposed for the explaining the mechanism of aging, free radical/oxidative stress theory is one of the most accepted one. Antioxidant capacity of the plasma is related to dietary intake of antioxidants; it has been found that the intake of antioxidant rich diet is effective in reducing the deleterious effects of aging and behavior. Several researches suggest that the combination of antioxidant/anti-inflammatory polyphenolic compounds found in fruits and vegetables may show efficacy as anti-aging compounds. Subset of the flavonoids known as anthocyanins, are particularly abundant in brightly colored fruits such as berry fruits and concord grapes and grape seeds.  (source)

• Reduces inflammation:

Inflammation is the body’s method for managing disease, harm, aggravation or stress. It prompts warm, torment, redness or swelling around the influenced body part. Most inflammation is sure as it demonstrates that the body has recognized a risk and is endeavoring to manage the issue. In any case, some inflammation is superfluous and harms the body’s cells when there is no contamination, damage, bothering or worry to manage. Luckily, the phenolic acids can help monitor pointless inflammation. The strong antioxidants of phenolic acids are powerful against inflammation. (source)

Ranking list of top foods list with Polyphenols (Phenolic Acid)

• Antioxidant effects of Polyphenol, phenolic acid on cancer:

Antioxidants are substances that protect a human body’s cells from free radicals. Free radicals are destructive substances that are discharged into the body amid oxygen based responses. They have been connected with serious disease such as cancer, diabetes, a weak invulnerable system along with noticeable indications of maturing. Luckily, the greater parts of the phenolic acids aside from “capsaicin” are intense cancer prevention agents that can guard you from the antagonistic impacts related with free radicals. Several mechanisms of action have been identified for chemoprevention effect of polyphenols, these include estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity, antiproliferation, induction of cell cycle arrest or apoptosis, prevention of oxidation, induction of detoxification enzymes, regulation of the host immune system, anti-inflammatory activity and changes in cellular signaling

Ranking list of top foods list with Polyphenols (Phenolic Acid)

 

• Neuro-Protective Effects and Mental health boosters:

The phenolic acids have a considerable measure of potential with regards to boosting the emotional wellbeing. Early research proposes that phenolic acids may go about as an energizer and furthermore it prevents the Alzheimer’s disease. What’s more, they may likewise ensure against Alzheimer’s malady while vanillin may shield the cerebrum cells from harm, prevents Alzheimer’s infection and Parkinson’s ailment. In any case, additionally studies are required before the impacts of the phenolic acids on brain health are affirmed. Oxidative stress and damage to brain macromolecules is an important process in neurodegenerative diseases. Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most common occurring neurodisorder affecting up to 18 million people worldwide. Because polyphenols are highly antioxidative in nature, their consumption may provide protection in neurological diseases. It was observed that the people drinking three to four glasses of wine (vines that have Polyphenol contents) per day had 80% decreased incidence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease compared to those who drank less or did not drink at all. (source)

 

Green Tea, Antioxidant effects and benefits

Polyphenol Supplements interactions

These mostly happen with supplements not the foods containing Polyphenol

  • Iron depletion in populations of people who have marginal iron stores
  • Interference with thyroid hormone metabolism
  • Interactions with pharmaceutical drugs, enhancing their biologic effects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References and sources for Polyphenols online:

http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v64/n3s/fig_tab/ejcn2010221t1.html

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/12/14/polyphenols-benefits.aspx

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835915/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antioxidant_effect_of_polyphenols_and_natural_phenols

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/81/1/215S.full

 

 

Published papers and articles  and References for Polyphenols

1. Scalbert A, Manach C, Morand C, Remesy C. Dietary polyphenols and the prevention of diseases. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2005;45:287–306. [PubMed]
2. Spencer JP, Abd El Mohsen MM, Minihane AM, Mathers JC. Biomarkers of the intake of dietary polyphenols: strengths, limitations and application in nutrition research. Br J Nutr. 2008;99:12–22. [PubMed]
3. Beckman CH. Phenolic-storing cells: keys to programmed cell death and periderm formation in wilt disease resistance and in general defence responses in plants? Physiol. Mol. Plant Pathol. 2000;57:101–110.
4. Graf BA, Milbury PE, Blumberg JB. Flavonols, flavonones, flavanones and human health: Epidemological evidence. J Med Food. 2005;8:281–290. [PubMed]
5. Arts ICW, Hollman PCH. Polyphenols and disease risk in epidemiologic studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81:317–325. [PubMed]
6. Kondratyuk TP, Pezzuto JM. Natural Product Polyphenols of Relevance to Human Health. Pharm Biol. 2004;42:46–63.
7. Shahidi F, Naczk M. Food phenolics, sources, chemistry, effects, applications. Lancaster, PA: Technomic Publishing Co Inc; 1995.
8. de Groot H, Rauen U. Tissue injury by reactive oxygen species and the protective effects of flavonoids. Fundam Clin Pharmacol. 1998;12:249–255. [PubMed]
9. Adlercreutz H, Mazur W. Phyto-oestrogens and Western diseases. Ann Med. 1997;29:95–120. [PubMed]
10. Wink M. Compartmentation of secondary metabolites and xenobiotics in plant vacuoles. Adv Bot Res. 1997;25:141–169.
11. Simon BF, Perez-Ilzarbe J, Hernandez T, Gomez-Cordoves C, Estrella I. Importance of phenolic compounds for the characterization of fruit juices. J Agric Food Sci. 1992;40:1531–1535.
12. Manach C, Scalbert A, Morand C, Rémésy C, Jimenez L. Polyphenols: food sources and bioavailability. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;79:727–747. [PubMed]
13. Parr AJ, Bolwell GP. Phenols in the plant and in man. The potential for possible nutritional enhancement of the diet by modifying the phenol content or profile. J Agric Food Chem. 2000;80:985–1012.
14. Sosulski FW, Krygier K, Hogge L. Importance of phenolic compounds for the characterization of fruit juices. J Agric Food Chem. 1982;30:337–340.
15. Price KR, Bacon JR, Rhodes MJC. Effect of storage and domestic processing on the content and composition of flavonol glucosides in onion (Allium cepa) J Agric Food Chem. 1997;45:938–942.
16. Crozier A, Lean MEJ, McDonald MS, Black C. Quantitative analysis of the flavonoid content of commercial tomatoes, onions, lettuce, and celery. J Agric Food Chem. 1997;45:590–595.
17. D’Archivio M, Filesi C, Benedetto RD, Gargiulo R, Giovannini C, Masella R. Polyphenols, dietary sources and bioavailability. Ann Ist Super Sanità 2007;43:348–361. [PubMed]
18. Day AJ, Williamson G. Biomarkers for exposure to dietary flavonoids: a review of the current evidence for identification of quercetin glycosides in plasma. Br J Nutr. 2001;86:S105–S110. [PubMed]
19. Setchell KD, Faughnan MS, Avades T, Zimmer-Nechemias L, Brown NM, et al. Comparing the pharmacokinetics of daidzein and genistein with the use of 13C-labeled tracers in premenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77:411–419. [PubMed]
20. Duthie GG, Pedersen MW, Gardner PT, Morrice PC, Jenkinson AM, McPhail DB, Steele GM. The effect of whisky and wine consumption on total phenol content and antioxidant capacity of plasma from healthy volunteers. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1998;52:733–736. [PubMed]
21. Young JF, Nielsen SE, Haraldsdóttir J, Daneshvar B, Lauridsen ST, Knuthsen P, Crozier A, Sandström B, Dragsted LO. Effect of fruit juice intake on urinary quercetin excretion and biomarkers of antioxidative status. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;69:87–94. [PubMed]
22. Gee JM, DuPont MS, Rhodes MJ, Johnson IT. Quercetin glucosides interact with the intestinal glucose transport pathway. Free Radic Biol Med. 1998;25:19–25. [PubMed]
23. Crespy V, Morand C, Besson C, Manach C, Demigne C, Remesy C. Quercetin, but not its glycosides, is absorbed from the rat stomach. J Agric Food Chem. 2002;50:618–621. [PubMed]
24. Passamonti S, Vrhovsek U, Vanzo A, Mattivi F. Fast access of some grape pigments to the brain. J Agric Food Chem. 2005;53:7029–7034. [PubMed]
25. Halliwell B, Zhao K, Whiteman M. The gastrointestinal tract: a major site of antioxidant action? Free Radic Res. 2000;33:819–830. [PubMed]
26. Clifford MN. Chlorogenic acids and other cinnamates. Nature, occurence, dietary burden, absorption and metabolism. J Sci Food Agric. 2000;80:1033–1043.
27. Olthof MR, Hollman PC, Katan MB. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans. J Nutr. 2001;131:66–71. [PubMed]
28. Kuhnau J. The flavonoids. A class of semi-essential food components: their role in human nutrition. World Rev Nutr Diet. 1976;24:117–191. [PubMed]
29. Lee MJ, Maliakal P, Chen L, Meng X, Bondoc FY, et al. Pharmacokinetics of tea catechins after ingestion of green tea and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate by humans: formation of different metabolites and individual variability. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11:1025–1032. [PubMed]
30. Falany CN. Enzymology of human cytosolic sulfotransferases. Faseb J. 1997;11:206–216. [PubMed]
31. Spencer JP, Chowrimootoo G, Choudhury R, Debnam ES, Srai SK, Rice-Evans C. The small intestine can both absorb and glucuronidate luminal flavonoids. FEBS Lett. 1999;458:224–230. [PubMed]
32. Hollman PC, Tijburg LB, Yang CS. Bioavailability of flavonoids from tea. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 1997;37:719–738. [PubMed]
33. Dangles O, Dufour C, Manach C, Morand C, Remesy C. Binding of flavonoids to plasma proteins. Methods Enzymol. 2001;335:319–333. [PubMed]
34. Dufour C, Loonis M, Dangles O. Inhibition of the peroxidation of linoleic acid by the flavonoid quercetin within their complex with human serum albumin. Free Radic Biol Med. 2007;43:241–252. [PubMed]
35. Vitrac X, Moni JP, Vercauteren J, Deffieux G, Mérillon JM. Direct liquid chromatography analysis of resveratrol derivatives and flavanonols in wines with absorbance and fluorescence detection. Anal Chim Acta. 2002;458:103–110.
36. Luqman S, Rizvi SI. Protection of lipid peroxidation and carbonyl formation in proteins by capsaicin in human erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress. Phytother Res. 2006;20:303–306. [PubMed]
37. Pandey KB, Mishra N, Rizvi SI. Protective role of myricetin on markers of oxidative stress in human erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress. Nat Prod Commun. 2009;4:221–226. [PubMed]
38. Pandey KB, Rizvi SI. Protective effect of resveratrol on markers of oxidative stress in human erythrocytes subjected to in vitro oxidative insult. Phytother Res. 2009. In press. [PubMed]
39. Renaud S, de Lorgeril M. Wine, alcohol, platelets, and the French paradox for coronary heart disease. Lancet. 1992;339:1523–1526. [PubMed]

 

Best foods for Cardiovascular diseases, what causes Cardiovascular issues

Best foods for Cardiovascular diseases, what causes Cardiovascular issues

With the rising number of patients suffering from heart disease, a lot of research has been done to find out exactly what causes it. Cardiovascular issues can refer to a number of heart or blood vessel issues. They include coronary heart disease, heart attacks, congestive heart failure and congenital heart disease. Research shows that Cardiovascular disease tops the list of causes of death for both men and women in the U.S. Coronary disease is the most common.

Cardiovascular

The coronary disease starts with the damage to the inner layers and lining of the heart arteries. A number of factors are attributed to this damage. These include smoking, high levels of cholesterol in the body, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and blood vessel inflammation. When the arteries are damaged, the build up of plaque can begin, which can later harden – reducing the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the heart –  or rapture – causing blood clots.

 

Some of the causes of heart disease, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, sleep apnea, stress and an unhealthy diet can be controlled. Others such as family, history, age and menopause and pre-eclampsia cannot.

 

Many of the controllable causes can either be reversed or prevented by making changes in your diet. WE will talk about the best foods you can take to prevent and manage cardiovascular disease.

 

Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as tuna, salmon and trout have an anti-clotting effect that will keep the blood flowing. They are also known to lower triglyceride (a type of fat that leads to heart disease)content in the body

 

A diet rich in walnuts can significantly lower your risk of heart disease. They contain monosaturated fats that decrease your ‘bad’ cholesterol and raise your ‘good’ cholesterol.

 

Berries are loaded with polyphenols. These are antioxidants that eliminate free radicals in your body. Free radicals have been found to cause a variety of diseases, such as heart disease.

 

Dairy products have a high potassium content. Potassium has the effect of lowering blood pressure. If you choose the fat-free or low-fat variety, you limit your intake of saturated fat, which can raise your cholesterol levels. Other potassium rich foods include bananas, potatoes and oranges.

 

Legumes such as chickpeas, beans and lentils are a good source of soluble fibre. These lower the level of ‘bad’ cholesterol in the body. Other sources of soluble fibre include apples, pears, eggplant and okra.

 

A cup or more of oatmeal every day can significantly lower your LDL cholesterol. It provides you with the amount of beta-glucan your body requires to help lower cholesterol.

 

Fats are very important in our diet. Completely eliminating them from your diet is definitely not an option. Adding olive oil to your diet when you need to limit saturated fats is a great option. You may also decide to use canola or safflower oil.

 

Remember when everyone said that you should not eat chocolate? Well, research now shows that consuming dark chocolate containing at least 70 percent of cocoa is good for you. It is rich in flavanols which help lower blood pressure and prevent clots from forming.

 

You can significantly decrease your risk of heart disease by adjusting your diet to include foods that lower blood pressure, reduce cholesterol levels and prevent blood clots.

How high bad cholesterol contributes to aging proccess

How high bad cholesterol contributes to aging proccess

research in progress

 

How High bad Cholesterol Contributes To Aging Process

It is important to note that our bodies need cholesterol to function – only healthy levels. Cholesterol is a fatty substance that is manufactured by the liver and distributed in the body. It enables our bodies to make vitamin D hormones and also makes up bile acids. High cholesterol levels mean that you have more cholesterol in your blood than your body needs to function. Having high cholesterol does not necessarily mean that you have to be overweight or obese. Cholesterol level is simply determined using a blood test.

 

There are two types of cholesterol. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol picks up extra cholesterol in your blood stream and redirects it to your liver for repurposing or ejection from the body. Bad cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol transport cholesterol to where it may be needed.

How High bad Cholesterol Contributes To Aging Process

Arteries move blood from your heart to the rest of your body. Very high levels of LDL and low levels of HDL can cause your arteries to develop plaque, which is a hardened mixture of fat, cholesterol and other compounds. As the arteries narrow, not enough blood flows to your heart and this may cause a heart attack. Also, reduced blood supply can cause chest discomfort, pain in your joints and back and pressure.

How does this contribute to premature ageing? If you do not have enough energy to move about and you experience pain when you do, chances are that you will not participate in physical activity. There is a direct correlation between exercise and youthfulness. Plaque builds up also interferes with blood flow to your arms and legs making you feel pain or numbness. There is a heightened risk of infection and lack of blood to the tissues may cause tissue death (gangrene)

 

Your skin is very delicate. It has a dense network of tiny veins and arteries under it that supply it with blood and help with the cooling action of the skin. When blood supply s compromised, toxins are not effectively removed from your body and heat cannot be regulated well. Proteins that are required for skin elasticity and tautness are transferred by the blood. If the supply of these proteins is insufficient, the skin looks dull, gets wrinkles and looks darker.

 

Ageing is not only manifested on your skin. It also takes a toll on your brain. Too much bad cholesterol blocks arteries meaning that there is not enough oxygen being supplied to the brain. Brain cells rapidly get damaged and start to die. This can lead to various neurodegenerative conditions that are normally linked to old age.

 

High cholesterol levels can be accompanied by problems of obesity. It is a known fact that when you are overweight, you tend to look older than you really are. The skin is stretched too much and may become flaky and sag.

 

High cholesterol levels in the body can be decreased by leading a healthy lifestyle. Incorporating regular exercise and eating foods that lower cholesterol levels.

DHA & EPA Antioxidant and anti-aging benefits

DHA & EPA effects and antioxidant benefits!

 

Introducing DHA & EPA:

Omega-3 fatty acids are connected to healthy aging in humans. The omega-3 unsaturated fats derived from fishes, EPA and DHA, have been related with fetal improvement, cardiovascular activities, and Alzheimer’s sickness. Nonetheless, in light of the fact that our bodies don’t proficiently deliver some omega-3 unsaturated fats from marine sources, it is important to get satisfactory sums through fish and fish oil items. The effective and strong antioxidants of EPA and DHA help improving health. They are imperative for appropriate fetal improvement, including neuronal, retinal, and invulnerable function positively and have been connected to provide great outcomes in anticipation, management of weight as well as intellectual capacity in those with exceptionally mellow Alzheimer’s sickness.

Antioxidant Effects of DHA & EPA:

The DHA & EPA supplements have numerous effects on heart. They fight against arrhythmias, heart assault and stroke. They likewise moderate plaque develops, lessen triglycerides, circulatory strain, irritation and thickening, and enhance lipid proportions. Because of their mitigating impacts and strong antioxidants, they might be helpful in treating rheumatoid joint inflammation, asthma and Crohn’s illness. The potential part of DHA & EPA in counteracting and treating osteoporosis, renal disease, cataracts, Alzheimer’s illness, depression and different conditions is as yet being examined.

 

 

Get DHA & EPA for:

For the highest amount of EPA and DHA here is the list of high omega foods by draxe:

  • Mackerel: 6,982 milligrams in 1 cup cooked (174 precent DV)
  • Salmon Fish Oil: 4,767 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (119 percent DV)
  • Cod Liver Oil: 2.664 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (66 percent DV)
  • Walnuts: 2,664 milligrams in 1/4 cup (66 percent DV)
  • Chia Seeds: 2,457 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (61 percent DV)
  • Herring: 1,885 milligrams in 3 ounces (47 percent DV)
  • Salmon (wild-caught): 1,716 milligrams in 3 ounces (42 percent DV)
  • Flaxseeds (ground): 1,597 milligrams in 1 tablespoon (39 percent DV)
  • Tuna: 1,414 milligrams in 3 ounces (35 percent DV)
  • White Fish: 1,363 milligrams in 3 ounces (34 percent DV)
  • Sardines: 1,363 milligrams in 1 can/3.75 ounces (34 percent DV)
  • Hemp Seeds: 1,000 milligrams  in 1 tablespoon (25 percent DV)
  • Anchovies: 951 milligrams in 1 can/2 ounces (23 percent DV)
  • Natto: 428 milligrams in 1/4 cup (10 percent DV)
  • Egg Yolks: 240 milligrams in 1/2 cup (6 percent DV)

 

Antioxidant benefits of DHA & EPA:

 

  • Decrease brain aging and keeps brain healthy: The EPA & DHA supplements are important and might be taken to keep up solid capacity of the mind and retina due to their strong antioxidants. DHA is a building square of tissue in the cerebrum and retina of the eye. It assists in shaping neural transmitters, for example, phosphatidylserine, which is vital for the working of brain. DHA is found in the retina of the eye and taking DHA might be fundamental for keeping the working of eye great.

 

  • Cancer Treatment: Studies revealed that DHA & EPA supplements can avoid and kill different kind of cancers, including colon, breast as well as prostate. While being an effective supplement for cancer patients, at the same time it’s also an effective treatment in those cancer treatments that are done naturally.

 

  • Great for cardiovascular system: EPA and DHA supplements are changed over into substances like hormones known as prostaglandins, and they manage cell action and perfect cardiovascular capacity.

 

  • Diabetes: The strong antioxidants of DHA and EPA can also help in decreasing the danger of diabetic patients from resulting cognitive deficit since it shields the hippocampus cells from being pulverized. Furthermore, they could also help decrease oxidative anxiety, which assumes a great part in the advancement of both micro-vascular and cardiovascular diabetes difficulties.

 

  • Decrease Joint Pains: All the essential antioxidants found in EPA and DHA seem to decrease few joint pains. Human reviews have demonstrated the supplemental fish oil decreases fiery joint pain. They are also successful in diminishing such pain that is brought by joint pain.

 

  • Beneficiary for Human Development: Human development and scholarly advancement – DHA assumes an essential part during the development and improvement of fetal. DHA of the high concentrations are found in the mind and increment 300 to 500 percent in a newborn child’s cerebrum amid the last trimester of pregnancy. Adding DHA supplements in to the pregnant mother’s eating routine might be helpful for the embryo’s mental health. Elderly individuals ought to likewise take EPA DHA, on the grounds that as adults get more established, the bodies frame less EPA and DHA, which may bring about less mental concentration and psychological capacity. Taking some EPA DHA supplements likewise may help with mental variations.

 

  • Decrease muscle degeneration: The strong antioxidants of DHA and EPA diminish the rate of muscle degeneration. A few researches recommends that fit body mass is better held after surgery by expanding the intake of EPA in the eating routine. There are a lot of confirmations proposing that fish oil helps muscle development.

Omega 3 fatty acids, DHA & EPA are naturally found in fishes as well as fish oils. However, DHA & EPA Supplements can also be consumed few times in a week in order to get all the above mentioned benefits.

 

 

Reference Websites:
www.livestrong,com
www.mercola.com

Hydrogen Peroxide, antioxidant benefits and effects!

Some on Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide, antioxidant benefits and effects!

First some on how antioxidants work with free radicals and where is Hydrogen Peroxide:

Free radicals can be broken down into five types. The first four types come from oxygen atoms and are called Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), but the fifth type derives from nitrogen:

Superoxide ion (O): An oxygen molecule with an extra electron that can damage mitochondria, DNA and other molecules.
Hydroxyl radical (OH): A highly reactive molecule formed by the reduction of an oxygen molecule, capable of damaging almost any organic molecule in its vicinity, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and DNA. OH cannot be eliminated by an enzymatic reaction.
Singlet oxygen: Formed by your immune system, singlet oxygen causes oxidation of your LDL.
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2): Not a free radical itself, but easily converts to free radicals like OH, which then do the damage. Hydrogen peroxide is neutralized by peroxidase (an enzymatic antioxidant).
Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) (NO): Nitric acid is the most important RNS.
These various free radical species can damage DNA in different ways.

They can disrupt duplication of DNA, interfere with DNA maintenance, break open the molecule or alter the structure by reacting with the DNA bases. Cancer, atherosclerosis, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s disease, and cataracts are examples of diseases thought to result from free radical damage.

In fact, free radicals are implicated in more than 60 different diseases.

Lipids in cell membranes are quite prone to oxidative damage because free radicals tend to collect in cell membranes, known as “lipid peroxidation.” (The lipid peroxide radical is sometimes abbreviated as LOO.) When a cell membrane becomes oxidized by an ROS, it becomes brittle and leaky. Eventually, the cell falls apart and dies.

This is akin to what happens when butter, vegetable oils or meat becomes rancid—and why manufacturers sometimes add agents to prevent that. How can this free radical pillage be stopped?

This is where antioxidants come in. (sources)

Antioxidants can be categorized in multiple ways. Based on their activity, they can be categorized as enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Enzymatic antioxidants work by breaking down and removing free radicals. The antioxidant enzymes convert dangerous oxidative products to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and then to water, in a multi-step process in presence of cofactors such as copper, zinc, manganese, and iron. Non-enzymatic antioxidants work by interrupting free radical chain reactions. Few examples of the non-enzymatic antioxidants are vitamin C, vitamin E, plant polyphenol, carotenoids, and glutathione.7 (source)

Free radicals are atoms, molecules or ions with unpaired electrons, which are highly active to chemical reactions with other molecules. In the biology system, the free radicals are often derived from oxygen, nitrogen and sulphur molecules. These free radicals are parts of groups of molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive sulphur species (RSS). For example, ROS includes free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2−•), perhydroxyl radical (HO2•), hydroxyl radical (▪OH), nitric oxide and other species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), (source)

About Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide:

Using hydrogen peroxide on cuts and scratches truly isn’t just the most ideal approach to use it due to the fact that there are a lot more benefits of it. Hydrogen peroxide has various awesome uses outside of medical aid. Hydrogen peroxide is the main germicidal agent made just out of water and oxygen. Similar to ozone, it executes the organisms of illness formed by oxidation. Hydrogen peroxide is viewed as the most secure and natural effective sanitizer. It executes microorganisms by oxidizing them, which can be best depicted as a controlled consuming procedure. At the point when Hydrogen peroxide responds with natural material it separates into oxygen and water. As an extreme, nontoxic compound, the hydrogen peroxide works amazingly in some other ways too and it is affordable, as well. Below are some antioxidant benefits of hydrogen peroxide.

The results of some researches obtained show that the antioxidant and anti-radical activity of phenolic acids correlated positively with the number of hydroxyl groups bonded to the aromatic ring. The model of an ortho substitution of hydroxyl groups to the aromatic ring seems to be adequate for antioxidant and H2O2 or DPPH• scavenging activity of phenolic acids. (source)

Antioxidant & other benefits of Hydrogen Peroxide:

  • Cancer Treatment with strong Hydrogen Peroxide antioxidants: The cancer is spreading a lot in people and there are several characteristic drugs that must be utilized to stop the spreading and dispose of the cancer cells either by executing the cancer cells or by killing the organisms inside the cancer cells and turning around the cancer cells into ordinary cells. The antioxidants generally found in Hydrogen peroxide are useful in killing such organisms and can decrease the risk of cancer.

 

  • Maintain common health: The human body makes hydrogen peroxide and its strong antioxidants are able to battle such diseases which must be removed to make our immune framework work accurately. The White platelets are known as Leukocytes. A sub-class of Leukocytes called Neutrophils delivers hydrogen peroxide as the main line of barrier against poisons, parasites, microorganisms as well as infections and yeast.

 

  • Infection treatment: By soaking he infected area of body in 3% of hydrogen peroxide for few minutes a few times each day can help getting rid of that infection. Indeed, even gangrene that would not heal with any solution has been recuperated by absorbing Hydrogen peroxide due to its strong antioxidant reactions on wounds.

 

  • Help removing parasites: As in a lot of other treatments, when taken inside, the effective and strong antioxidants of hydrogen peroxide adds oxygen to the body’s inward condition. This oxidized condition is one in which parasites can’t exist and all of them are normally wiped out from the body.

 

  • Treatment for foot fungus: The researches still can’t seem to have been done to demonstrate this works for everybody that it is a fast home cure for foot fungus. In order to help treating the foot fungus, the use of the spray containing 3% hydrogen peroxide and water on them (particularly the toes) and letting them dry can heal it if done regularly. The strong antioxidants of hydrogen peroxide help a lot to treat the disease.

 

  • Best for mouth and teeth: Many individuals don’t understand that hydrogen peroxide makes an extremely viable and economical mouthwash. Utilize 3% of hydrogen peroxide and include a dash of fluid chlorophyll for enhancing if you want. On the other side, taking one capful of hydrogen peroxide and holding in your mouth for 10 minutes and then spit it out will never cause ulcer and your teeth will be more white. On the off chance that you have a frightful toothache and can’t get to a dental practitioner immediately, put a capful of 3% Hydrogen peroxide into your mouth and hold it for 10 minutes a few times each day. The torment will decrease significantly.

 

  • Treats the birds Mites Infections: Patients contaminated by minor vermin stated that hydrogen peroxide successfully removes the parasites on their skins. They shower it on their skin two or three times with a couple of minutes between the applications and get stunning outcomes. The antioxidants available in hydrogen peroxide help fighting the disease and provide great results at the end.

 

  • Best for Wound care: The antioxidants available in Hydrogen Peroxide help in healing wounds and stop the bleeding from little wounds. A few sources prescribed to soak wounds for five or more minutes a few times each day in order to heal the wound.

 

  • Treating Sinus Infection: A tablespoon of 3% Hydrogen peroxide added to some non-chlorinated water can be utilized as a nasal shower. Contingent upon the level of sinus contribution, one should alter the measure of peroxide utilized. It can be used as a treatment for sinus infection due to the strong antioxidants available in it.

 

 

Reference Websites:
www.wakeup-world.com
www.realfarmacy.com

Acai Berries antioxidant effects

Glutathione the mother of antioxidants, but how helpful can it really be as a supplement?

What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system

What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system

Introduction to Antioxidant

Antioxidant
an·ti·ox·i·dant
ˌan(t)ēˈäksədənt,ˌanˌtīˈäksədənt/

“a substance that inhibits oxidation, especially one used to counteract the deterioration of stored food products. a substance that removes potentially damaging oxidizing agents in a living organism.”
What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system
First thing that comes up in google search is what you see above. But what it really means that it removes potentially damaging oxidizing agents? what do the oxidizing agents do? what antioxidants do to them? how it helps our body with aging? how is it related to aging? Do antioxidants help your body in weight loss processes? How? Do they really keeps us young? are they same as anti-inflammatory substances? 



Lets take a closer look to the whole concept of Antioxidants.

It has been about 50 years only that even the word Antioxidant is being used. 

What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system

The human body by its self naturally produces free radicals and the antioxidants to counteract their damaging effects, its something our body is aware of and has some solutions for it. However, in most cases, free radicals far outnumber the naturally occurring antioxidants and thats why we see that it could expedite aging and health issues. But what are free radicals? for a short answer: 

 What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system

Free Radicals and Oxidative Damage



Human body need oxygen for its chemical activities and in order to live. the simple act of breathing is the start of the formation of highly reactive molecules called free radicals. Free radicals interact with other molecules in the body as they are in blood and metabolism, they cause Oxidative Damage. 

What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system



Oxidative damage can result the development of a wide range of illnesses and diseases or increasing the possibility of illness by effecting the immune system. Oxidative stress occurs when the production of reactive oxygen is greater than the body’s ability to detoxify and clean the reactive intermediates. This imbalance as mentioned before leads to oxidative damage to proteins, molecules, and genes within the body. when proteins start being damaged means now all your body is in danger cause not only your muscles but all of cell’s functions even DNA functions are done by different kinds of protein. But the free radical intensity does not only depend on the body it self it depends a lot on many factor and behaviors that we  can control. Some external body causes could increase the free radicals and the damage they have on our body like:

  • Smoking (first or second hand)
  • Excessive exposure to UV rays
  • Pollution
  • Eating an unhealthy diet
  • Certain medications and/or treatments
  • Excessive exercise
  • Breathing deep and enough



What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system


How Free Radicals are Formed



Normally, in our body bonds dont lag, they dont split in a way that leaves a molecule with an odd (unstable condition or harmful situation), unpaired electron. But when weak bonds split, free radicals are formed. Free radicals are very unstable it means they can react and bond quickly with many potentialities and affect quickly the other compounds, trying to capture the needed electron to gain stability. 

Some internally generated sources of free radicals are:

  • Mitochondria
  • Xanthine oxidase
  • Peroxisomes
  • Inflammation
  • Phagocytosis
  • Arachidonate pathways
  • Exercise
  • Ischemia/reperfusion injury
  • Some externally generated sources of free radicals are:
  • Cigarette smoke
  • Environmental pollutants
  • Radiation
  • Certain drugs, pesticides
  • Industrial solvents
  • Ozone


Generally, free radicals attack (try to bond and become stable) the nearest stable molecule, “stealing” its electron. When the “attacked” molecule loses its electron, it becomes a free radical itself and causing this in a mass scale in body by beginning a chain reaction. Once the process is started, it can cascade, finally resulting in the disruption of a living cell. Cells are smallest stable and almost independent units in our body. every and each one of them are playing an important role in what an organ and bigger part does. It means they are independent but they also work as a team and they communicate, so if something goes wrong in one specially in RNA/DNA level it will spread. they communicate with substances and some other factors so many effects that free radicals have can be very local and at the same time in whole body.


What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system

Our body sometimes uses the free radicals. basically our body pretty much knows what they are and some free radicals arise normally during metabolism. Sometimes the body immune systems cells or white blood cells purposefully create them to neutralize viruses and bacteria, well that is as smart as it can get. However, environmental factors such as pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke and herbicides can also increase free radicals unnaturally. Usually The body handles free radicals, but if antioxidants are unavailable, or if the free-radical production becomes excessive, damage can occur. 


Of particular importance is that free radical damage accumulates with age. Yes aging can be expedited by free radicals. they make your body an unsafe place to live for cells. they interfere with metabolism and damage the immune system and their number one scary result can be cancer. 


Antioxidants Counteract Oxidative Stress and Free Radicals
The body is aware of its substances it naturally produces antioxidants like superoxide dismutase, catalase, or peroxidase enzymes, as a means of defending itself against free radicals. The antioxidants neutralize the free radicals, so makes them harmless to other cells. Antioxidants can repair damaged molecules in body by donating hydrogen atoms to them. Some antioxidants even have a chelating effect on free radical production that’s catalyzed by heavy metals. In this situation, the antioxidant contains the heavy metal molecules so strongly that the chemical reaction necessary to create a
free radical never occurs. When these kinds of antioxidants are water-soluble, it also causes the removal of the heavy metals from the body via the urine. for example Astaxanthin is in some cases considered nature’s most powerful antioxidant in foods and also available in pills and supplements now.



What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system

Different Types of Antioxidants

 

All the antioxidants are different and function different. Astaxanthin is actually a lipid-soluble antioxidant, while resveratrol is a water-soluble antioxidant And Each type of them function in its own way. antioxidants can be categorized in tow different ways, as a matter of fact three but molecular size is not an effective issue in terms of choosing what to take for you.


1. Antioxidants can be categorized basically in two categories:

 

Soluble in lipids/fat (hydrophobic) or water (hydrophilic). Both of them are neede in body in order to protect your cells. basically because body cells have both environments in them and as a matter of facts the interior of your cells and the fluid between them are composed of water, while the cell membranes themselves are mostly made of fat. The free radicals can strike both the watery cell contents or the fatty cellular membrane. Lipid-soluble antioxidants are the ones that protect your cell membranes from lipid peroxidation. Some examples of lipid-soluble antioxidants are vitamins A and E, carotenoids, and lipoic acid. Water-soluble antioxidants are found in aqueous fluids, like your blood and the fluids examples of water-soluble antioxidants are vitamin C, polyphenols, and glutathione.


2. They can also be categorized in another way as enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants:


Enzymatic antioxidants benefit you by breaking down the structure of the free radicals and removing free radicals from your system. They can flush out dangerous oxidative products by converting them into hydrogen peroxide, then into water and gone you are free of free radicals.

Non-enzymatic antioxidants benefit you by interrupting free radical chain reactions that is another way to block them from damaging the whole environment. Some examples are carotenoids, vitamin C, vitamin E, plant polyphenols, and glutathione (GSH). Most antioxidants found in supplements and foods are non-enzymatic.



What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system

 
What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune systemAstaxanthin has an especially high propensity for absorbing the excess energy from singlet oxygen, releasing it as heat, and returning the oxygen (and itself) back to its original state. This process is known as “quenching.”  Because of very different structures of all the molecules we call antioxidants the actual chemical procedure is different and the effectiveness and the way they can help the body is different. 

Why may Antioxidant Supplements do not work as well as foods Work?

Some Clinical and scientific studies of antioxidant supplements have not found them to be as effective as expected. Researchers have suggested several reasons:
 
> The Antioxidant beneficial health effects of a diet high in vegetables and fruits or other antioxidant-rich foods may actually be caused by other substances. that we dont know about them.
 
> Problem with doses. The effects of the large doses of antioxidants used in supplementation studies may be different from the smaller doses in natural foods.
 
> Differences in the chemical composition of antioxidants, For example, eight chemical forms of vitamin E are present in natural foods. but only two in Vitamin E supplements like alpha-tocopherol. Alpha-tocopherol also has been used in almost all research studies on vitamin E.


ALPHA - LIPOIC ACID What are Antioxidants & free-radicals? Antioxidants effects on aging, weight loss, Immune system

Good natural sources for Vitemin C, vitamin A and vitamin E as the most popular antioxidants:


Good Food Sources of Vitamin C (mg/serving)

Food
Amount
Vitamin C
Orange juice, fresh squeezed
1 cup
124
Grapefruit juice, fresh squeezed
1 cup
94
Papaya
1/2 medium
94
Cantaloupe
1/4 melon
86
Orange
1 medium
80
Green peppers, raw chopped
1/2 cup
67
Tomato juice
1 cup
44
Strawberries
1/2 cup
43
Broccoli, raw chopped
1/2 cup
41
Grapefruit
1/2 medium
40
Source: USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 13
 

Good Food Sources of Vitamin E (mg/serving)

Food
Amount
Vitamin E
Almonds
1/4 cup
9.3 (13.9 IU)
Sunflower seeds
1/4 cup
5.8 (8.7 IU)
Safflower oil
1 tbsp
4.7 (7.0 IU)
Peanuts
1/4 cup
3.3 (4.9 IU)
Peanut butter
2 tbsp
3.2 (4.8 IU)
Corn oil
1 tbsp
2.8 (4.2 IU)

Good Food Sources of Vitamin A  


Food                                                      mcg RAE perserving    IU per serving   Percent DV*


Sweet potato, baked in skin, 1 whole        1,403               28,058         561

Beef liver, pan fried, 3 ounces                   6,5822             2,175          444
Spinach, frozen, boiled, ½ cup                  5731                1,458          229
Carrots, raw, ½ cup                                 459                  9,189          184
Pumpkin pie,  1 piece                              488                   3,743          249
Cantaloupe, raw, ½ cup                           135                   2,706          54
Peppers, sweet, red, raw, ½ cup               117                   2,332          47
Mangos, raw, 1 whole                              112                   2,240          45
Black-eyed peas (cowpeas),boiled, 1 cup   66                     1,305          26
Apricots, dried, sulfured, 10 halves            63                    1,261          25
Broccoli, boiled, ½ cup                              60                    1,208          24
Ice cream, French vanilla, soft serve, 1 cup 278                 1,014           20
Cheese, ricotta, part skim, 1 cup                263                  945             19
Tomato juice, canned, ¾ cup                     42                    821             16
Herring, Atlantic, pickled, 3 ounces            219                   731            15



Some important questions about antioxidants:

 


Where are antioxidants? 

 
They are naturally in foods and vegetables and fruits. some of them have more some less but still they are the best source comparing to supplements. Means eating fish regularly is better that fish oil supplements only. 
 

How can we get them? 

 
IN foods and vegetables and fruits. Also available in supplements. but in some cases it is better to take the natural option than just the pill.
 

Do natural sources work the same as supplements in terms of antioxidants? 

 
In some cases ye sand some no. 
 

What is the strongest antioxidant?

 
I n some cases they say its DHA fish oil and in some cases Astaxanthin in terms of effects in what part of cell or body. And in some cases olive extracts also has been mentioned. For example DHA in fish oils improve the brain plasticity/ BDNF and is the best in therms of brain aging. but it is different in all the body.
 

Is there a list of antioxidants?

 
Yes you can find a complete list of antioxidants in our website: antioxidants list
 

Antioxidants are effective more in natural forms like food or pills/ tablets/ supplements? 

 
The researches has shown that it depends on the issue and on the antioxidant substance. in some cases because of the different doses and absorbent quality the food id much better and in some cases it can be the same. 
 

What foods are high in antioxidants?

 
Fish, fish oils, vegetables, fruits and so on are the natural sources. there are also extracts in supplements that can do the job in some cases. 
 

What do antioxidants do? or what are the benefits of antioxidants ?

 
Just read the article please
 

Do antioxidants cure cancer? 

 
No, not exactly. but they can improve the symptoms and reduce the possibility of getting cancer.
 

Do antioxidants prevent cancer?

 
In many researches the free radicals are the ones causing cancer or increasing the chance to get cancer but if you get enough antioxidants for sure you are reducing the chance of cancer. it does apply to many cancer types but to all.
 

Are antioxidants the same as vitamins? 

 
Yes an some cases like vitamin E or C or A. but not all of them are considered as vitamins. 
 

 

Which diseases can be healed and/or cured by antioxidants?

It is not limited to these diseases or body conditions but these are the most associated ones with antioxidants

 

This can be a very small and useful list of them but in fact as mentioned antioxidants are substances fighting Degenerative Diseases effecting both immune system and DNA in many levels this list of Degenerative Diseases can also be considered.

Categorization of Degenerative Diseases

  • Neoplasms (divisions of mutated cells)

               – Examples:

                Cancer

                Tumor

  • Diseases of the Blood
  • Endocrine Diseases

                – Examples:

                 Thyroidism

  • Metabolic Syndrome (is a cluster of conditions – high blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat (typically around the waist) and high level of bad cholesterol or low level of good cholesterol)

               – Examples:

                  Diabetes 

                  Hyperlipidemia (high level of fats in the blood)

                  Arteriosclerosis (thickening and hardening of artery walls)

                  Fatty Liver (build up of fats in the liver)

                  Hypertension (high blood pressure)

                  Obesity (being over weight)

  • Diseases of the Nervous System
  • Diseases of the Eye and Adnexa
  • Diseases of the Ear and Mastoid Process
  • Diseases of the Circulatory System
  • Diseases of the Respiratory System
  • Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue
  • Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue
  • Diseases of the Genitourinary System
  • Ischemia (restriction or cut-off of blood supply)/reperfusion (restoration of blood supply) injuries

                – Examples:

                   Cerebral Infraction (stroke caused by blockage)

                   Myocardial infraction (heart attack)

                   Organ transplant 

                   Post Cardiac Arrest (resuscitated heart after the heart stopped)

  • Mitochondrial Diseases
  • Aging

                – Examples:

                   Wrinkles,

                   Freckles

  • Hemodialysis

                – Examples:

                   Cystisis

  • Inflammation

                – Examples:

                  Rhematoid arthritis

                  Wound healing

                  Bowel disease

  • Neuroprotection

                – Examples:

                   Dementia

                   Parkinson Disease

                   Depression

  • Medication Induced

               – Examples:

                  Anesthetia

                  Radiatheraphy

                 Chemotheraphy

  • Stress Induced

               – Examples:

                 Exercise

                 Fatigue

Antioxidants Also Combat Infectious Diseases in basically two main ways:


1- Building or maintaining very healthy immune cells to fight the invasion
2- Countering the cell damages caused by the invasions/infections

 
And this is a good list of diseases caused by infections that can be improved by antioxidants and the most popular one whit fighting infections is vitamin C.


  • Bacteria Infections
               – Examples:
                 Strep throat
                 Tuberculosis
                 Urinary tract infections (UTI)
  • Virus Infections
               – Examples:   
                  AIDS
                 Common cold
                 Ebola hemorrhagic fever
                 Genital herpes
                 Influenza
                Measles
                Chickenpox and shingles
  • Fungi Infections
              – Examples:
                 Thrush
                 Athlete’s foot
                 Ringworm
  • Protozoa Infections
                – Examples:
                  Giardia
                  Malaria
                  Toxoplasmosis
  • Helminths Infections
                – Examples:
                   Tapeworm infection
                   Roundworms infection
                   Heartworms infection

Do antioxidants help in weight loss? or Do antioxidants help us lose weight?

 
Yes and NO. Well Not exactly, the antioxidants effectdoes not directly effect your body fat. But help a lot in body metabolism that can be said that it indirectly helps with losing weights by iproving body metabolism and blod stream.
but it is very important to know that many fruits and also extracts that are considered for their antioxidants effects has shown in researches that they also have benefits in loosing weight like Vitamin E or Green Tea and so on.











Sources in web and scientific articles on antioxidants, free radicals and oxidation:


nutrex-hawaii.com

news-medical.net
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
cancer.gov
google.com
simplyantioxidant.com

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Some handy articles on antioxidants, free radicals and oxidation:
 
 

 

list of articles:

1. Halliwell B, Gutteridge JMC. Free radicals in biology and medicine. 4th. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press; 2007.

2. Bahorun T, Soobrattee MA, Luximon-Ramma V, Aruoma OI. Free radicals and antioxidants in cardiovascular health and disease. Internet J. Med. Update. 2006;1:1–17.

3. Valko M, Izakovic M, Mazur M, Rhodes CJ, et al. Role of oxygen radicals in DNA damage and cancer incidence. Mol. Cell Biochem. 2004;266:37–56. [PubMed]

4. Valko M, Leibfritz D, Moncola J, Cronin MD, et al. Free radicals and antioxidants in normal physiological functions and human disease. Review. Int. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 2007;39:44–84. [PubMed]

5. Droge W. Free radicals in the physiological control of cell function. Review. Physiol. Rev. 2002;82:47–95.[PubMed]

6. Willcox JK, Ash SL, Catignani GL. Antioxidants and prevention of chronic disease. Review. Crit. Rev. Food. Sci. Nutr. 2004;44:275–295. [PubMed]

7. Pacher P, Beckman JS, Liaudet L. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite in health and disease. Physiol. Rev. 2007;87:315–424. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

8. Genestra M. Oxyl radicals, redox-sensitive signalling cascades and antioxidants. Review. Cell Signal. 2007;19:1807–1819. [PubMed]

9. Halliwell B. Biochemistry of oxidative stress. Biochem. Soc. Trans. 2007;35:1147–1150. [PubMed]

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12. Valko M, Morris H, Cronin MTD. Metals, toxicity and oxidative stress. Curr. Med. Chem. 2005;12:1161–1208. [PubMed]

13. Parthasarathy S, Santanam N, Ramachandran S, Meilhac O. Oxidants and antioxidants in atherogenesis: an appraisal. J. Lipid Res. 1999;40:2143–2157. [PubMed]

14. Frei B. Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant vitamins. Linus Pauling Institute. Oregon State University. 1997 http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/f-w97/reactive.html .

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19. Christen Y. Oxidative stress and Alzheimer disease. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2000;71:621S–629S. [PubMed]

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